July 20–24, 2015
Portland, OR

OSCON 2015 Schedule

Use the calendar icon [calendar icon] next to each listing you want to attend. Then use the personal schedule button below to generate your schedule.

Wednesday, July 22

Portland 251
Add Docker in production: Reality, not hype to your personal schedule
10:40am Docker in production: Reality, not hype Bridget Kromhout (Pivotal)
Add Microservices. Microservices everywhere! to your personal schedule
11:30am Microservices. Microservices everywhere! Jérôme Petazzoni (Docker)
Add Protecting the future of mobile payments to your personal schedule
1:40pm Protecting the future of mobile payments Jonathan LeBlanc (PayPal / Braintree)
Add A rebasing workflow for Git to your personal schedule
2:30pm A rebasing workflow for Git Emma Jane Hogbin Westby (UN-OCHA)
Portland 252
Add Create beautiful dashboards from many sources of data using open technologies to your personal schedule
10:40am Create beautiful dashboards from many sources of data using open technologies Jonas Rosland (EMC), Kate Greenough (EMC)
Add Say No like a boss! to your personal schedule
11:30am Say No like a boss! Deb Nicholson (Open Invention Network)
Add Fear of failing fast: How to avoid sabotaging your success to your personal schedule
1:40pm Fear of failing fast: How to avoid sabotaging your success Leslie Hawthorn (Red Hat), Amye Scavarda (Red Hat )
Add Open source big graph analytics on Neo4j with Apache Spark to your personal schedule
2:30pm Open source big graph analytics on Neo4j with Apache Spark Kenny Bastani (Digital Insight)
Add Solr for data science to your personal schedule
4:10pm Solr for data science Grant Ingersoll (Lucidworks)
Add Solve optimization problems using swarm intelligence to your personal schedule
5:00pm Solve optimization problems using swarm intelligence James McCaffrey (Microsoft)
Portland 255
Add 99 ways to kill an open source project to your personal schedule
10:40am 99 ways to kill an open source project Brandon Keepers (GitHub)
Add High performance servers without the event loop to your personal schedule
2:30pm High performance servers without the event loop David Cheney (Canonical)
Add Getting under your hood: Cars and computers to your personal schedule
5:00pm Getting under your hood: Cars and computers John Feminella (Pivotal)
Portland 256
Add The paradox of technology choice to your personal schedule
10:40am The paradox of technology choice Michelle Brush (Cerner Corporation)
Add Building a mobile location-aware system with beacons to your personal schedule
11:30am Building a mobile location-aware system with beacons Jonathan LeBlanc (PayPal / Braintree)
Add Space, time, and state to your personal schedule
1:40pm Space, time, and state Amy Palamountain (GitHub)
Add I've been hacked, now what? to your personal schedule
4:10pm I've been hacked, now what? Beth Tucker Long (Treeline Design)
D135/136
Add Open source is ugly: Improving UX and UI design to your personal schedule
10:40am Open source is ugly: Improving UX and UI design Garth Braithwaite (Adobe)
Add Articulating design decisions to your personal schedule
1:40pm Articulating design decisions Tom Greever (Bitovi)
Add Decoupling the frontend through modular CSS to your personal schedule
2:30pm Decoupling the frontend through modular CSS Julie Cameron (Articulate)
Add A general theory of reactivity to your personal schedule
5:00pm A general theory of reactivity Kris Kowal (Uber)
D137/138
Add Visualizing program execution to your personal schedule
10:40am Visualizing program execution Jan Paul Posma (Brigade)
Add Building and running an open source programs office: Lessons from the TODO Group to your personal schedule
11:30am Building and running an open source programs office: Lessons from the TODO Group Chris DiBona (Google), Chris Aniszczyk (Cloud Native Computing Foundation), Chris Kelly (GitHub), Will Norris (Google), Christine Abernathy (Facebook), Gianugo Rabellino (Microsoft)
Add Talking to non-technical people about data (especially if they’re your boss) to your personal schedule
1:40pm Talking to non-technical people about data (especially if they’re your boss) Linda Powell (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau)
Add Creating trust organizations to your personal schedule
2:30pm Creating trust organizations Bruce Eckel (Mindview, LLC)
Add Pingo means "pin, go!": Universal IoT programming in Python to your personal schedule
4:10pm Pingo means "pin, go!": Universal IoT programming in Python Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Add Data modeling Cassandra using CQL3 to your personal schedule
5:00pm Data modeling Cassandra using CQL3 Mike Biglan (Analytic Spot), Elijah Hamovitz (Analytic Spot)
D139/140
Add Introduction to developing embedded Linux device drivers to your personal schedule
10:40am Introduction to developing embedded Linux device drivers Nick Gudman (Hewlett Packard)
Add Building a modular front-end framework and style guide for a large organization to your personal schedule
11:30am Building a modular front-end framework and style guide for a large organization Scott Cranfill (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau), Mollie Bates (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau)
Add Humane interviewing to your personal schedule
1:40pm Humane interviewing Jay Goel (Rent the Runway)
Add High adventures in sniffing my own metadata to your personal schedule
2:30pm High adventures in sniffing my own metadata Josh Deprez (Google Australia)
Add Rolling dice alone: Board games with remote friends to your personal schedule
5:00pm Rolling dice alone: Board games with remote friends Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
E145
Add It's metaphors all the way down to your personal schedule
10:40am It's metaphors all the way down Brian Proffitt (Red Hat)
Add Visualizing flux: Time travel, torque, and temporal maps to your personal schedule
11:30am Visualizing flux: Time travel, torque, and temporal maps Aurelia Moser (Mozilla Science)
Add Scala at scale at Twitter to your personal schedule
1:40pm Scala at scale at Twitter Travis Brown (Twitter, Inc.)
Add Bootstrapping a recommendation engine to your personal schedule
4:10pm Bootstrapping a recommendation engine Max De Marzi (NeoTechnology)
Add Selling open source 101 to your personal schedule
5:00pm Selling open source 101 Henrik Ingo (MongoDB)
E146
Add You've got questions, we've got answers! to your personal schedule
1:40pm You've got questions, we've got answers! Grant Ingersoll (Lucidworks)
Add Building your open resume to your personal schedule
2:30pm Building your open resume Mark Ferree (Chapter Three)
Add CoreOS DNA on Debian to your personal schedule
5:00pm CoreOS DNA on Debian Patrick Galbraith (Hewlett Packard)
E147/148
Add Practical mobile computer vision: How card.io works to your personal schedule
2:30pm Practical mobile computer vision: How card.io works Josh Bleecher Snyder (PayPal)
Add Creating Bluetooth LE devices with Arduino to your personal schedule
5:00pm Creating Bluetooth LE devices with Arduino Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries)
E141
Add The cursed oracle: Cassandra's past, present and future to your personal schedule
10:40am The cursed oracle: Cassandra's past, present and future Rachel Pedreschi (DataStax)
Add "Unique but fast!" - Make your Tizen GUI application brilliant to your personal schedule
11:30am "Unique but fast!" - Make your Tizen GUI application brilliant ChunEon Park (Samsung Electronics)
Add Evolution of information security threats to your personal schedule
1:40pm Evolution of information security threats Jarret Raim (Rackspace), Laurens Van Houtven (Rackspace)
Add Ironic: A modern approach to hardware provisioning to your personal schedule
2:30pm Ironic: A modern approach to hardware provisioning Devananda van der Veen (HP Cloud)
Add Offline-first mobile web apps with PouchDB, IBM Cloudant, and IBM Bluemix to your personal schedule
5:00pm Offline-first mobile web apps with PouchDB, IBM Cloudant, and IBM Bluemix Bradley Holt (IBM Watson Data Platform)
E142
Add Take control of your applications to your personal schedule
1:40pm Take control of your applications Matt Quill (F5 Networks)
Add IoTivity and the Internet of Open Source Things to your personal schedule
2:30pm IoTivity and the Internet of Open Source Things Soohong Park (Samsung)
E 143/144
Add No more web app headaches! to your personal schedule
10:40am No more web app headaches! Janina Bläsius (SAP SE), Michael Graf (SAP SE)
Add Wednesday opening welcome to your personal schedule
9:00am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Wednesday opening welcome Sarah Novotny (NGINX), Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Matthew McCullough (GitHub)
Add Making things open to your personal schedule
9:05am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Making things open Hadley Beeman (U.K. Government | W3C)
Add Open Source Lynchpins in 2015: the Anti-Venom to Vendor Lock-in to your personal schedule
9:20am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Open Source Lynchpins in 2015: the Anti-Venom to Vendor Lock-in Angel Diaz (IBM)
Add How Facebook open sources at scale to your personal schedule
9:30am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
How Facebook open sources at scale James Pearce (Facebook)
Add They're here. Now what? to your personal schedule
9:45am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
They're here. Now what? Allison Randal (Hewlett Packard Enterprise and Open Source Initiative)
Add The future is awesome (and what you can do about it) to your personal schedule
9:55am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
The future is awesome (and what you can do about it) Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Add Advancing open containers through Pan-Industry collaboration to your personal schedule
10:00am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Advancing open containers through Pan-Industry collaboration Jim Zemlin (The Linux Foundation)
10:05am Closing Remarks
Room: Portland Ballroom
Add 5 Years of OpenStack to your personal schedule
7:00pm Event
Room: Leftbank Annex
5 Years of OpenStack
Add Booth Crawl / Ask Me Anything About chats to your personal schedule
5:40pm Event
Room: Expo Hall
Booth Crawl / Ask Me Anything About chats
8:15am Morning coffee service
Room: Portland Ballroom Foyer
7:30am Morning Yoga
Room: BOTTOM OF THE STAIRS BY THE E ROOMS
Add Wednesday BoFs to your personal schedule
8:30pm Plenary
Room: D135/136, D137/138, D139/140, E141, E142, E145, E146, E147/E148
Wednesday BoFs
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Scale
Docker in production: Reality, not hype
Bridget Kromhout (Pivotal)
DramaFever, the largest streaming video site for international content, uses AWS to power its streaming video platform, and has been running Docker in production since about October 2013 (well before it even went 1.0). This talk goes into detail about we use Docker to make development more consistent and deployment more repeatable.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Architecture
Microservices. Microservices everywhere!
Jérôme Petazzoni (Docker)
Thanks to Docker and containers, microservices architectures are no longer reserved to large organizations like Netflix or Amazon. Let's review the benefits of those architectures, for Devs and Ops, in projects big and small, and how to realize them with the open source container technology available today.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Protect
Protecting the future of mobile payments
Jonathan LeBlanc (PayPal / Braintree)
We are now in an age where more people have phones than toilets, and there are more active cell phones than people on the planet. How do we protect all of these devices as they’re roaming around unsecured locations, especially when we want to pay for something.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Foundations
A rebasing workflow for Git
Emma Jane Hogbin Westby (UN-OCHA)
You've decided to level up your Git skills and have heard that rebasing is where it's at. In this session we'll talk about: WHY rebasing can make it easier to untangle your project's history; WHEN you should use rebase; WHAT rebasing actually does to your repository; and HOW it actually looks when things go right (and how to recover when things go wrong).
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Architecture
Java-based microservices, containers, Kubernetes - how to
Ray Tsang (Google)
Join this session to learn how to create a Java-based microservice using Spring Boot, containerize it using Maven plugins, and subsequently deploy a fleet of microservices and dependent components such as Redis using Kubernetes. Toward the end of the session, let's take a look at how we can apply the same patterns to other runtimes, such as Vert.x and Grails.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Architecture
Continuous delivery and large microservice architectures: Reflections on Ioncannon
Kevin Scaldeferri (New Relic)
Continuous delivery of a monolith is easy - just automate, automate, automate! But what challenges will you run into applying the same ideas to 300 microservices? Come and find out!
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Data
Create beautiful dashboards from many sources of data using open technologies
Jonas Rosland (EMC) et al
There are tons of metrics that can be measured out there. Facebook likes, Twitter followers, website hits, database queries, number of VMs, cheapest lunch in the neighborhood, and many more. What if you could collect those metrics and choose the ones you'd like to present into a nice dashboard? And perhaps add easy analytics to it? Learn how to use Dashing together with platforms like Keen.io.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Craft
Say No like a boss!
Deb Nicholson (Open Invention Network)
There's always plenty to do in the world of free and open source software, but saying yes to it all eventually leads to burnout. Not every job, module or meeting is going to lead to more of the kinds of opportunities you want. When should you reinvent the wheel and when should you settle for something that's good enough?
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Craft
Fear of failing fast: How to avoid sabotaging your success
Leslie Hawthorn (Red Hat) et al
While it’s easy to pay lip service to the idea of innovating by failing fast, humans are both neurally geared and financially incentivized to avoid failure. How can we create an environment that makes failing fast safe for the participants and their organizations?
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Data
Open source big graph analytics on Neo4j with Apache Spark
Kenny Bastani (Digital Insight)
Fast and scalable analysis of big data has become a critical competitive advantage for companies. There are open source tools like Apache Hadoop and Apache Spark that are providing opportunities for companies to solve these big data problems in a scalable way. Platforms like these have become the foundation of the big data analysis movement.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Data
Solr for data science
Grant Ingersoll (Lucidworks)
Search engine technology is rapidly evolving from keyword-based lookups, to a highly sophisticated ranking engine capable of incorporating many different features across complex data types. With the latest changes in Solr and Lucene, it is now possible to ask more interesting questions of multi-structured content than ever before, making them indispensable tools in the data science toolbox.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Solve
Solve optimization problems using swarm intelligence
James McCaffrey (Microsoft)
Swarm intelligence (SI) algorithms mimic the behaviors of groups such as flocks of birds and schools of fish. This session describes in detail four major SI algorithms: amoeba method optimization, particle swam optimization, simulated bee colony optimization, and firefly algorithm optimization. Attendees will receive Python source code for each algorithm.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Collaboration
99 ways to kill an open source project
Brandon Keepers (GitHub)
Sometimes, learning what not to do is the best path to success. This absurd, humorous, and completely serious talk will teach you everything you need to know to ensure that a healthy open source project meets its demise. Whether you are a user testing the open source waters, an experienced maintainer, or open source ate your hard drive, discover techniques to ruin your corner of the world.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Protect
Hardware hacking 101: There is plenty of room at the bottom
Federico Lucifredi (Red Hat)
This is a live demonstration of hacking into the processor embedded in an SD card, effectively turning the device into a covert Raspberry Pi-class computer under your complete control -- running Linux. There will be a discussion of similar attacks against ARM processors embedded in current HDD drive controllers.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Foundations
How to think in Go: Stories from a Perl developer turned Go developer
Daisuke Maki (HDE Inc)
Go is quickly becoming one of the many must-have items in our toolboxes. In this talk I will describe the common pitfalls and misunderstandings for people who have an extensive background in interpreted languages like myself. I will tell you all about my failures so you don't have to repeat them!
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Scale
High performance servers without the event loop
David Cheney (Canonical)
The Go programming language lets you write high performance network servers without resorting to event loops and callback spaghetti.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Design
Sass: What it is, how it's used, and why it's so syntactically awesome
Lucy Wyman (Puppet Labs)
This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and which tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Protect
Getting under your hood: Cars and computers
John Feminella (Pivotal)
There's a war on open standards and software brewing, and it's happening in a surprising location: under the hood of your car. In this talk, we discuss the storied history of OBD, a suite of related diagnostic protocols that's used by virtually every car sold in the US, EU, and China -- and how your ability to own and examine your vehicle's data might be threatened if some people have their way.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Architecture
The paradox of technology choice
Michelle Brush (Cerner Corporation)
The number of frameworks, patterns, platforms, and APIs available has exploded. Defining the architecture of a system requires navigating a sea of options. This talk frames architectural decisions in the context of behavioral economics. It covers how good or bad choice architecture can impact the software architecture and how organizations can guide engineers toward better choices.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Mobility
Building a mobile location-aware system with beacons
Jonathan LeBlanc (PayPal / Braintree)
What if instead of a broad location, you could have pinpoint location awareness of someone in a physical space. How could this change everything about how we interact with the physical world? In this session we'll explore open beacon technology, and how we can use these systems to change everything from shopping to accessibility for the disabled, all built on top of a mobile device.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Architecture
Space, time, and state
Amy Palamountain (GitHub)
Reactive programming is the trendy new way to build desktop and mobile apps. Reacting to user input over time can prove to be difficult, because of the enormous amount of state we need to keep track of. In this talk we will discover how to improve our reactive applications by removing the need for state entirely. This allows us to clearly reason about, and react to, user input over time.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Architecture
Designing for failure: How Uber scaled its realtime market platform
Matt Ranney (Uber)
As Uber moves into new markets with new services, designing for high availability and scalability presents some interesting challenges. Even brief outages in the service are very costly, with real-world impact on people's lives. This talk will cover the Uber architecture and how it handles every failure we can think of.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Protect
I've been hacked, now what?
Beth Tucker Long (Treeline Design)
Investigate a hacked WordPress website, and learn what the hacker has left behind, which tools will help find the vulnerability and point of entrance, how to seal up the most common problem areas, and how to set up notifications to help you spot a hack more quickly in the future. Even though we will be going through a WordPress website, most of the tools discussed are applicable to any website.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Scale
The evolution of the big data platform at Netflix
Eva Tse (Netflix, Inc)
At Netflix, the big data platform is the foundation for analytics that drives all product decisions. As for scale, it is one of the top three largest services running at Netflix. In this talk, you will learn about our open source-powered big data architecture in the AWS cloud, and how we build out the technology stack that comprises the big data platform at Netflix today.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Design
Open source is ugly: Improving UX and UI design
Garth Braithwaite (Adobe)
The design of an open source project will greatly effect a user's experience, and open source typically lacks solid design. In this session we'll talk about the current state of design and how we can raise the bar in an open source community.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Foundations
You type "google.com" into your browser bar and press enter: What happens next?
Graeme Mathieson (Wossname Industries)
We'll take a deep dive down the stack, into how the internet works to magically make Google's home page appear in our web browser. Topics will range from URL parsing and DNS resolution, through HTTP, TCP, IP, and routing, and all the way back up to browser rendering.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Design
Articulating design decisions
Tom Greever (Bitovi)
Every designer has had to justify designs to non-designers, yet most lack the ability to explain their choices in a compelling way. Effectively articulating design decisions is critical to a project’s success because the most articulate person wins. This session offers practical advice for talking to managers, developers, and other stakeholders to win them over and create the best user experience.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Design
Decoupling the frontend through modular CSS
Julie Cameron (Articulate)
This talk will look at how taking a modular, object-oriented approach to CSS can turn frontend woes into frontend wins. We’ll examine modern CSS approaches like OOCSS, SMACSS, and BEM and demonstrate how they will help to not only decouple your CSS styles and reduce specificity conflicts, but how they will also help to decouple your CSS and HTML from your JavaScript and feature specs.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Craft
Coding in the FLOW: Structuring your development session to promote a state of flow
Caskey Dickson (Microsoft)
Did you know that some development practices actively encourage flow while others prevent you from ever getting there in the first place? This talk will lay out the conditions of flow, what established programming techniques encourage it, and strategies for finding ways to create flow sessions in your daily development life, regardless of what your established software-development lifecycle is.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Foundations
A general theory of reactivity
Kris Kowal (Uber)
Promises, streams, observables, and behaviors are some of the building blocks of event driven programming. What makes each of these tick and when would you choose one over another?
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Foundations
Visualizing program execution
Jan Paul Posma (Brigade)
We don’t see how code executes. We take peeks, using console.logs and breakpoints, but they don’t tell the whole story. This talk shows future toolmakers and (non-) visual thinkers how to take off our blindfolds.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Scale
Building and running an open source programs office: Lessons from the TODO Group
Chris DiBona (Google) et al
Join a discussion with representatives from well-known tech companies to discuss the challenges of building and running an open source office at scale.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Data
Talking to non-technical people about data (especially if they’re your boss)
Linda Powell (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau)
Everyone at OSCON knows that good data coupled with modern open source technology can revolutionize business. But does senior management know? This presentation is about how to convince very powerful people with limited tech literacy that investing in good data and good data technology helps promote the organization’s mission.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Collaboration
Creating trust organizations
Bruce Eckel (Mindview, LLC)
Based on six years of research and organization visits, I present the "Trust Organization Manifesto," a radically different and yet surprisingly well-tested set of guidelines for self-organizing a company where "work is joy."
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Mobility
Pingo means "pin, go!": Universal IoT programming in Python
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Pingo is a uniform Python API for devices that have programmable I/O for physical computing: Raspberry Pi, Arduino TRE, Intel Edison, BeagleBone Black etc. The design of the Arduino board and IDE made device programming accessible, and the design of the Pingo API aims to do the same with the Internet of Things, bringing interactive discovery and high-level services to embedded systems development.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Data
Data modeling Cassandra using CQL3
Mike Biglan (Analytic Spot) et al
CQL3 has a relational-database-centric abstraction that hides many key details of the underlying storage. Though CQL can be an efficient and convenient tool to use when querying, knowing how CQL actually maps to Cassandra's storage structure is key to being able to create scalable and flexible data models.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Mobility
Introduction to developing embedded Linux device drivers
Nick Gudman (Hewlett Packard)
Learning to develop device drivers can be intimidating, but Linux makes it simpler than ever to write your own device driver. Using a simple driver for a monochromatic character display as a guide, we will briefly explore important topics for developing embedded Linux device drivers.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Design
Building a modular front-end framework and style guide for a large organization
Scott Cranfill (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau) et al
Keeping code and design in sync across large teams and multiple projects can be a big challenge. At the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a new federal agency, the in-house design and development team has created its own modular front-end framework and style guide. Team members will talk about how this has fostered cross-team collaboration and improved the consistency of their products.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Collaboration
Humane interviewing
Jay Goel (Rent the Runway)
We often say that interviews should be a two-way street, but it doesn’t always feel that way. Here we talk about specific techniques for humanely interviewing engineers, and why this is good for business. We'll also talk about tips for candidates that help move things along.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Protect
High adventures in sniffing my own metadata
Josh Deprez (Google Australia)
What can be learned about a person's internet habits if every packet in and out was logged by a transparent man-in-the-middle? Here's what I discovered from a few months of self-experimentation.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Design
Building the $9 computer, or how I learned to stop worrying and love embedded Linux
Dave Rauchwerk (Next Thing Co)
1GHz ARM Cortex A8, 512MB RAM, 4GB NAND Flash, WiFi, Bluetooth - and it's completely open source. Also, it costs $9. See how, why, and what it means for the future of open hardware.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Design
Rolling dice alone: Board games with remote friends
Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Board games are hard at the best of times – you have to find friends who have the free time to play, find a game everyone is happy to play, and more! When friends move elsewhere, things get even harder! This sessions explores the challenges of telepresence board gaming. Learn why and how you should care, how the problems are being addressed, and how it’s relevant to remote collaboration.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Craft
It's metaphors all the way down
Brian Proffitt (Red Hat)
Everything we do in technology - operating systems, applications, systems administration - is based on nothing solid and real, but rather conceptualizations and ideas that we make accessible through metaphors. In fact, far from being "non-creative," nerd-types may be among the most creative storytellers in history.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Data
Visualizing flux: Time travel, torque, and temporal maps
Aurelia Moser (Mozilla Science)
The historical versioning of maps defines some of the most fascinating social, political, and environmental flux of precedent. Everything from the eruption of post-World Cup tweets, to the migration patterns of mammals, can be mapped with OSS. This talk will cover time travel as it can be viewed in visualizations: the ways we partner time-series data with interactive maps @CartoDB.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Scale
Scala at scale at Twitter
Travis Brown (Twitter, Inc.)
Scala plays a central role in many parts of Twitter's infrastructure, and Twitter's open source projects are widely used in the Scala community. While Scala has brought many benefits to Twitter, its nature as a relatively young hybrid OOP / FP language has also posed some challenges. This talk will provide an overview of how Twitter maintains one of the largest Scala codebases on the planet.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Solve
Open source licensing on GitHub by the numbers
Ben Balter (GitHub)
Open source isn't open source without a license. GitHub is the de facto hub for creating and sharing open source software, but how much of it is truly open? How has license usage changed over time? How does licensing effect contribution, reuse, and project evolution? Join Ben Balter and Tal Niv, two of GitHub's legals for a quantitative analysis of license usage across all of GitHub's 19M repos.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Solve
Bootstrapping a recommendation engine
Max De Marzi (NeoTechnology)
Do you need to build a recommendation engine like yesterday and have no idea where to start? How to get over the cold start problem? How to get some initial data? How do you know if its even working? Learn how to get past all that and get up and recommending quickly.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Craft
Selling open source 101
Henrik Ingo (MongoDB)
As open source has become mainstream and a business, many companies face a knowledge gap and may not even realize it: most executives and sales managers have no particular experience in the dynamics of open source. Unfortunately, most open source folks have no experience in sales either! This session will help each group to understand, and apply, both the open source and sales parts together.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Protect
How my POODLE lost his Xen state by seeing a Ghost, going BERserk, and getting ShellShock with a Heartbleed
Constanza Heath (Intel)
2014 was a hard year for open source software when it comes to security vulnerabilities. There were great amounts of attention focused on Heartbleed, ShellShock, BERserk, etc. Was that attention well founded? This presentation intends to find out.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Collaboration
InnerSource as the anti-silo: How open source style has broken silos while strengthening systems at PayPal
Cedric Williams (PayPal)
Maturing engineering organizations tend to coalesce into silos around products, technologies, and business units. InnerSource uses proven open source approaches for development inside the firewall, bypassing the constraints of silo architecture while increasing velocity and quality. This session will examine how InnerSource is growing at PayPal and what has been learned so far.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Solve
You've got questions, we've got answers!
Grant Ingersoll (Lucidworks)
Ever wonder how Watson beat all comers in Jeopardy or how Siri or Google Now work? Thinking about deploying question answering (QA) technology in your application? QA and NLP technology have finally hit the mainstream, and are making information access more powerful every day. The best part? Open source technologies make it easier than ever to build and deploy question answering technology!
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Craft
Building your open resume
Mark Ferree (Chapter Three)
It is not in your best interest to leave most of your work hidden away at your employer. GitHub has created a showcase for your work, and hiring managers will spend time looking through your work before you are invited to come in for an interview. I will cover strategies for increasing both the quality and quantity of your open source contributions to improve your open resume.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Foundations
Unicode beyond just characters: Localization with the CLDR
Nova Patch (Shutterstock)
Unicode is much more than just characters. The Unicode Consortium defines open standards for collating, parsing, and formatting data in much of the world’s languages. The Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) is the largest standard repository of locale data along with specifications for its use, and is a powerful resource for software localization.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Architecture
CoreOS DNA on Debian
Patrick Galbraith (Hewlett Packard)
The HP Advanced Technology Group recently created a proof of concept to build CoreOS components - Docker, Fleet, and Etcd - on top of Debian, using Ansible and HP Cloud Virtual Machines to demonstrate the power and flexibility of a clustered Docker architecture. This talk will cover how our team built this proof of concept and show a ELK Stack demonstration application running on the cluster.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Solve
Hacking "Roller Coaster Tycoon" with genetic algorithms and Go
Kevin Burke (burke.services)
You might be good at designing coasters in "Roller Coaster Tycoon," but you could make even cooler coasters if you let Go build them for you. We'll look a little at RCT's code (written in x86) and how to reverse-engineer it. You'll learn how to design good genetic algorithms. Finally, we'll discuss the advantages of using Go's standard library for a project like this.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Solve
What every programmer should know about floating-point arithmetic
Joe Darcy (Oracle)
Learn about how floating-point arithmetic approximates real arithmetic, and lessons for more effective (and less surprising) numerical programming.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Mobility
Fixing the fragmentation problem for real-time communications.
Matthew Hodgson (Matrix.org)
An open, interoperable communication ecosystem for VoIP, IM, and IoT services currently feels farther away than ever. Users are forced into closed silos like WhatsApp and Facebook by their contacts, rather than choosing their preferred app/service. This talk discusses ways to fix the problem and introduces Matrix: an open standard for decentralised communication, which may provide a new hope.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Mobility
Practical mobile computer vision: How card.io works
Josh Bleecher Snyder (PayPal)
card.io scans credit cards using your phone's camera. It was recently open-sourced. This talk will explain how card.io works its magic. No computer vision or machine learning background required.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Collaboration
The Free Software Foundation, on the road for 30 years: Are we there yet, RMS?
John Sullivan (Free Software Foundation)
The FSF turns 30 this October. Don your freedom goggles and trip with its beardless executive director through 30 years of entertaining memorabilia and historical happenings (including "Who's this 'open source' kid and why's he on my lawn?"), then emerge, blinking, in the present. What are the challenges for user freedom in the next 30 years and how do we build a united movement to tackle them?
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Mobility
Creating Bluetooth LE devices with Arduino
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries)
Bluetooth LE is very different from classic Bluetooth, in fact pretty much the only thing that is the same is the name. Using Bluetooth LE radios properly involves creating custom services and characteristics. However, until recently, this was actually really hard to do without making use of expensive proprietary software tools.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored
The cursed oracle: Cassandra's past, present and future
Rachel Pedreschi (DataStax)
With 1000's of Cassandra users worldwide, we claim victory on how to keep a distributed database always available. Now it is time to tackle all the smaller problems that help a database go from great to spectacular. Developer productivity, ease of use, and a rich ecosystem are firmly in our target. Let's talk about what has been added and what's coming and why.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored
"Unique but fast!" - Make your Tizen GUI application brilliant
ChunEon Park (Samsung Electronics)
Recently, Samsung has released various products powered by Tizen, including the NX Camera Series, Z1 Smartphone, Samsung Gear, and SUHD TVs. Tizen is a brand new platform, so developers can easily enter and have a strong presence in the Tizen applications market.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored
Evolution of information security threats
Jarret Raim (Rackspace) et al
The landscape of information security has changed significantly over the last few years. Increasing amounts of economic value are directly linked to computer infrastructure, making that infrastructure increasingly interesting as a target for malicious actors, both state and private. In this talk, we'll explore this evolving problem space, and how Rackspace is helping solve problems in this space.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored
Ironic: A modern approach to hardware provisioning
Devananda van der Veen (HP Cloud)
Ironic is a modern tool for hardware provisioning. Combining a RESTful API, scalable control plane, and pluggable hardware drivers, Ironic installs operating systems efficiently and repeatably on diverse hardware. We will demonstrate Ironic with Ansible, install, build, and deploy a machine image, and discuss the project's architecture, history, and goals. Deep knowledge is not required.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Sponsored
Offline-first mobile web apps with PouchDB, IBM Cloudant, and IBM Bluemix
Bradley Holt (IBM Watson Data Platform)
Mobile web apps shouldn't stop working when there's no network connection. Based on Apache CouchDB, PouchDB is an open source syncing JavaScript database that runs within a web browser. Learn how to use HTML5, PouchDB, IBM Cloudant, and IBM Bluemix to build and deploy offline-first mobile web apps that provide a better, faster user experience both offline and online.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored
Streamlining and automating data ingestion into Hadoop
Sastry Malladi (StubHub)
Everyone wants to leverage Hadoop for their data processing needs, whether for real-time processing or batch processing; but there is no single common way to bring data from a variety of data sources and types into Hadoop in an automated fashion. In this talk we cover an approach that we took, and present the generic ingestion framework we developed that leverages Flume, Kafka, and others.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored
How your company can become a good open source citizen
Jared Smith (Bluehost)
We'll discuss concrete steps your company can take to become a good citizen in various open source communities, strategies to influence upper management and show them that it's in their best interest to become more involved with open source, and some of my experiences with companies I've worked for and how I was able to get them to become more involved with free and open source software.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored
Take control of your applications
Matt Quill (F5 Networks)
Take advantage of F5 scalable application delivery services to accelerate your application development process and migration to cloud architectures. Integrate with open source orchestration and cloud frameworks Puppet, Chef, Ansible, and OpenStack, enable automation and management of entire application stacks, starting at the server level and moving up to network and security services.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored
IoTivity and the Internet of Open Source Things
Soohong Park (Samsung)
This session will give an overview of what the various interpretations of the Internet of Things actually are, and the technologies behind them. It will talk about the IoTivity project, what it is trying to solve, and how it is going about that, including its governance structure and especially its unique relationship with the Open Interconnect Consortium.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Sponsored
The Curate’s Egg of modern architectures (and how DevOps can help)
Stevan Arychuk (New Relic)
Every company is a software company, but crafting good software is hard. This presentation will explore approaches needed to craft good software, look at why these modern architectures patterns are an important part of that story, and how DevOps and monitoring fits into this puzzle.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored
No more web app headaches!
Janina Bläsius (SAP SE) et al
Nowadays, there’s a wide variety of devices, platforms, and screen sizes on which web apps can be run. What if your web app was responsive, adaptive, and able to run on all devices without you having to take care of all the details? We will demonstrate how to build well-designed web apps based on the example of an app we created for one of the most loved sports in Germany: soccer.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored
Cache money: Tips for going fast in a slow world
Michael May (Fastly)
When it comes to caching, we fall into two categories - those who make phat stacks of cache money and those who suffer from cache anxiety. In this talk, we’ll cover HTTP caching, old and new strategies for caching historically ‘uncacheable’ content, and secret features of HTTP accelerators like Varnish.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored
Open source at 18 - The challenges of post-adolescence
Danese Cooper (PayPal)
As Open Source moves out of its teen years, more and more practitioners are younger than the movement. What should grown-up Open Source be doing around communities, licensing, corporate involvement and more? What's the minimum knowledge of history required to not screw up the future of Open Source?
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored
Open community for container technology: What does this mean to us?
Yujie Du (Huawei Technologies)
Why do we need an open source way when an emerging technology hits the world's largest market, China? Huawei would help the China community link up with the global community.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Sponsored
Development, testing, acceptance and production with Docker and Kubernetes
Patrick Reilly (Kismatic, Inc.)
Docker runs your code in a container, which is like a lightweight VM. A container runs your code directly on the host operating system and hardware, but in an isolated userspace. This way, you get all the isolation and consistency benefits of a VM, but with very little overhead. If you run your code on top of Linux in production, then Docker is for you pair this with Kubernetes and you're all set.
9:00am-9:05am (5m)
Wednesday opening welcome
Sarah Novotny (NGINX) et al
Program chairs Sarah Novotny, Rachel Roumeliotis, and Matthew McCullough open the first day of keynotes.
9:05am-9:20am (15m)
Making things open
Hadley Beeman (U.K. Government | W3C)
Openness is good for Government on many levels — open data, open standards, open source, open markets. Where we set the way we work in Government, it’s important to let industry determine the technical standards we work with.
9:20am-9:30am (10m) Sponsored
Open Source Lynchpins in 2015: the Anti-Venom to Vendor Lock-in
Angel Diaz (IBM)
Dr. Angel Diaz, IBM VP Cloud Architecture & Technology, provides a retrospective on the evolution of open source from the “old ways” in the early years to today’s new model of “code, community and culture” which brings together users and developers to accelerate innovation.
9:30am-9:45am (15m)
How Facebook open sources at scale
James Pearce (Facebook)
Ship a lot, or ship fast? These goals may seem to be at odds, but it's actually possible to have large, diverse portfolios of open source projects and maintain a fast-moving, iterative approach. In this talk, Facebook's open source lead James Pearce will discuss how Facebook is able to ship open source products twice a week and maintain quality, size, and speed.
9:45am-9:55am (10m) Sponsored
They're here. Now what?
Allison Randal (Hewlett Packard Enterprise and Open Source Initiative)
The early days of the open source movement were all about creating an approachable on-ramp to software freedom. We focused strongly on practical benefits of free software and refined the message, hoping to help the professional software sector better understand. We succeeded but success in our first goal doesn't mean we're done, it means we're due to clearly define the next phase of open source.
9:55am-10:00am (5m)
The future is awesome (and what you can do about it)
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
The 21st century is a time with an unprecendented expansion of ideas, culture, technology, information, and global justice. Compared to any ther point in history, humans are *flourishing*. Yet the way in which we think about the world—and our shared future in it—has not accelerated at the same pace. Join us to find out why the future is awesome, and what you can do about it.
10:00am-10:05am (5m)
Advancing open containers through Pan-Industry collaboration
Jim Zemlin (The Linux Foundation)
Jim will provide an update on the latest news from the open source community regarding containers technologies. The Open Container Initiative, formerly known as the Open Container Project, was announced just last month and Zemlin will share the latest information on these efforts and what comes next.
10:05am-10:10am (5m)
Break: Closing Remarks
7:00pm-8:30pm (1h 30m) Events
5 Years of OpenStack
It’s time to celebrate! Are you planning to attend OSCON? Then be sure to join the OpenStack Foundation on Wednesday evening, July 22nd 7:00-9:00pm at the Leftbank Annex located at 101 North Weidler Street, Portland Oregon 97227, to celebrate five years of OpenStack.
10:10am-10:40am (30m) Events
Morning Break sponsored by Capital One / Ask Me Anything About chats
Join O'Reilly speakers for informal question and answer sessions.
12:10pm-1:40pm (1h 30m) Events
Wednesday Lunch (Sponsored by HP) / Ask Me Anything About chats
Join O'Reilly speakers for informal question and answer sessions.
3:10pm-4:10pm (1h) Events
Afternoon Break Sponsored by SoftLayer / Ask Me Anything About chats
Join O'Reilly speakers for informal question and answer sessions.
5:40pm-7:00pm (1h 20m) Events
Booth Crawl / Ask Me Anything About chats
Quench your thirst with vendor-hosted libations and snacks while you check out all the cool stuff in the expo hall.
8:15am-9:00am (45m)
Break: Morning coffee service
7:30am-8:15am (45m)
Break: Morning Yoga
8:30pm-10:00pm (1h 30m) Events
Wednesday BoFs
Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions provide face to face exposure to those interested in the same projects and concepts. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (best practices, open data, standards). BoFs are entirely up to you. We post your topic and provide the space and time. You provide the engaging topic.