Turbocharging American Innovation

Engagement
Location: Independence Ballroom A Level:

In this rapid-fire session, we ask leaders from government, foundations, and private sector for ten policy changes that would increase the rate of American innovation. Tom Kalil, Policy Director for the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Lesa Mitchell of the Kaufman Foundation, and Tim O’Reilly of O’Reilly Media, will give us their top recommendations.

Photo of Tim O'Reilly

Tim O'Reilly

O'Reilly Media, Inc.

Tim has a history of convening conversations that reshape the industry. In 1998, he organized the meeting where the term “open source software” was agreed on, and helped the business world understand its importance. In 2004, with the Web 2.0 Summit, he defined how “Web 2.0” represented not only the resurgence of the web after the dot com bust, but a new model for the computer industry, based on big data, collective intelligence, and the internet as a platform. In 2009, with his “Gov 2.0 Summit,” he framed a conversation about the modernization of government technology that has shaped policy and spawned initiatives at the Federal, State, and local level, and around the world. He has now turned his attention to implications of the on-demand economy and other technologies that are transforming the nature of work and the future shape of the business world. He is the founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media and a partner at O’Reilly AlphaTech Ventures (OATV). He is also a founder and board member at Maker Media, which spun out of O’Reilly Media in 2012, and a board member at Code for America, PeerJ, Civis Analytics, and PopVox.

Photo of Thomas Kalil

Thomas Kalil

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Thomas Kalil is currently serving as the Deputy Director for Policy for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Senior Advisor for Science, Technology and Innovation for the National Economic Council.

Kalil is on leave from UC Berkeley, where he was Special Assistant to the Chancellor for Science and Technology. He was responsible for developing major new multi-disciplinary research and education initiatives at the intersection of information technology, nanotechnology, microsystems, and biology. He also conceived and launched a program called “Big Ideas @ Berkeley,” which provides support for multidisciplinary teams of Berkeley students that are interested in addressing economic and societal challenges such as clean energy, safe drinking water, and poverty alleviation.

In 2007 and 2008, Kalil was as the Chair of the Global Health Working Group for the Clinton Global Initiative, where he developed new public and private sector initiatives in areas such as maternal and child health, under-nutrition, and vaccines. Tom was also a Senior Fellow with the Center for American Progress, where he co-authored A National Innovation Agenda, one of the four pillars of CAP’s Economic Plan for Plan for the Next Administration. He was also a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Nanomix, and has served on three committees of the National Academy of Sciences, including the Committee to Facilitate Interdisciplinary Research.

Previously, Thomas Kalil served as the Deputy Assistant to President Clinton for Technology and Economic Policy, and the Deputy Director of the White House National Economic Council. He was the NEC’s “point person” on a wide range of technology and telecommunications issues, such as the liberalization of Cold War export controls, the allocation of spectrum for new wireless services, and investments in upgrading America’s high-tech workforce. He led a number of White House technology initiatives, such as the National Nanotechnology Initiative, the Next Generation Internet, bridging the digital divide, e-learning, increasing funding for long-term information technology research, making IT more accessible to people with disabilities, and addressing the growing imbalance between support for biomedical research and for the physical sciences and engineering. He was also appointed by President Clinton to serve on the G-8 Digital Opportunity Task Force (dot force).

Prior to joining the White House, Tom was a trade specialist at the Washington offices of Dewey Ballantine, where he represented the Semiconductor Industry Association on U.S.-Japan trade issues and technology policy. He also served as the principal staffer to Gordon Moore in his capacity as Chair of the SIA Technology Committee.

Tom received a B.A. in political science and international economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and completed graduate work at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He is the author of articles and op-eds on S&T policy, the use of prizes as a tool for stimulating innovation, nanotechnology, nuclear strategy, newborn health, vaccines, the impact of mobile communications in developing countries, U.S.-Japan trade negotiations, U.S.-Japan cooperation in science and technology, the National Information Infrastructure, distributed learning, and electronic commerce.

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Lesa Mitchell

Kauffman Foundation

Lesa Mitchell is a vice president with the Kauffman Foundation.
She has been responsible for the Foundation’s frontier work in understanding the policy levers that influence the advancement of innovation from universities into the commercial market and the new relationships between philanthropy and for profit companies. Under Mitchell’s leadership, the Foundation is defining and codifying alternative commercialization pathways, and identifying new models to foster innovation. Mitchell was instrumental in the founding of the Kauffman Innovation Network/ iBridge Network, the Translational Medicine Alliance, the National Academies-based University–Industry Partnership and leader in the replication of innovator-based mentor programs across the U.S. In addition, Mitchell serves on the boards of the Regenerative Medicine Foundation and the University of Kansas Institute for Commercialization.

Prior to joining Kauffman, Mitchell spent twenty years of her career in global executive roles at Aventis, Quintiles, and Marion Laboratories and ran an electronic clinical trials consulting business in support of global pharmaceutical clients.

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  • Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Esri
  • Microsoft
  • IBM
  • Palantir Technologies
  • Alfresco
  • Google
  • govWin
  • IdeaScale
  • Intel
  • NIC
  • Omidyar Network
  • Salesforce.com
  • Telligent
  • Safari Books Online

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Rob Koziura at (415) 947-6111 or email rkoziura@techweb.com

View a complete list of Gov 2.0 Summit contacts.

Gov 2.0 Events :  Gov 2.0 Expo  •  Gov 2.0 Summit