HTML5 Homesteading: Bringing Back the Spirit of Geocities for the Modern Web

Kyle Drake (Neocities)
1:30pm–2:00pm Wednesday, 04/22/2015
HTML5 and CSS3
Location: Salon 10
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 4 ratings)

When Geocities was shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Celine Dion MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. Today, most people express themselves in tiny square text boxes with artificial restrictions on what they can do. The result has been a consumption-driven internet where people no longer feel empowered to make things. Can we break this vicious, creativity-destroying cycle before it’s too late?

Since the Geocities shutdown, a revolution has happened: HTML5, JavaScript and CSS have propelled the web into a beautiful, dynamic, and rich way to express yourself with nothing more than an HTML file. But we lacked the portals to utilize this amazing new expressive power.

That’s why we built Neocities: to bring back the lost creative web that allowed everyone in the world to make a free web site, powered by the rich, expressive tools of the modern web. The result has been an amazing, rewarding, and crazy experience that has completely changed my mind on what’s next for the web (hint: it’s not social networks).

Creating your own web site isn’t nostalgia. It’s the future of the web. It’s time to bring back web surfing!

Photo of Kyle Drake

Kyle Drake

Neocities

Kyle Drake is a tech entrepreneur working to bring back the lost art of amateur personal websites with Neocities.

When not working on Neocities, Kyle helps to build the open source communities, including early work on BitcoinJS, Portland hackerspaces, and providing early advice and support to startups.

Some of Kyle’s varied interests include software architecture, simplicity, API design, economics, improved startup business models, tech sustainability, and weird ways to look at old problems.