Build resilient systems at scale
28–30 October 2015 • Amsterdam, The Netherlands

devops sessions

13:45–14:25 Thursday, 29/10/2015
Sarah Wells (Financial Times)
Slides:   1-PDF 
You've heard all about what microservices can do for you. You're convinced. So you build some. Reasoning about your functionality is way easier: these services are so simple! Then you get to the point where you have 35 microservices, and all the monitoring and alerting tactics you used for your monoliths are a complete disaster. Something needs to change and this talk will explain what and how.
11:50–12:30 Thursday, 29/10/2015
Lindsay Holmwood (Australian Government Digital Transformation Office)
Slides:   external link
"Fail fast, fail often" is a tech industry mantra. But what's the point of embracing failure if we're not learning anything from it? The language we use and views we hold when talking about failure shape the outcome of that discussion, and how we learn in the future. Let's talk about how to learn better about What Went Wrong and minimise blame in our organisations.
14:40–15:20 Friday, 30/10/2015
Matt Peterson (Cumulus Networks)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Networking is the last major compute infrastructure that is closed or dominated by proprietary vendors. In the last few years the industry has seen a dramatic shift into opening up – from hardware, protocols, and software in general. This talk will examine various efforts within the open networking space and how these may be applicable to your own needs. Will DevOps reach layer 2 & 3? Find out!
13:45–14:25 Friday, 30/10/2015
Slides:   1-PDF 
Find out how adding a robot to your chat channel can increase communication between team members and the tools they use. Featuring Hubot, the friendly open source robot from GitHub.
17:05–17:45 Thursday, 29/10/2015
Mark Barnes (Financial Times)
A throwaway comment at a work social turned into a handful of techies organising the FT technology departments’ first internal (and international) conference. This is about how we stole ideas for the format. What went wrong and what went very right. How we hope to do it better next time, and ultimately why an internal conference is a great idea for the culture in your organisation.
14:40–15:20 Thursday, 29/10/2015
Mike Amundsen (API Academy, CA Technologies)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Most of us know about Conway's adage "Any organization will produce a design which is a copy of the organization's communication structure." But Conway coined four laws in his 1968 paper "How Committees Invent." What are the other ones? Why are we not talking about them? And what do they tell us about optimizing teams in a distributed world?
17:05–17:45 Thursday, 29/10/2015
Jonathan Klein (Attend)
HTTP/2 is the future of the web, and promises to bring performance improvements, simplified markup, and lower resource utilization on the server. This talk will show you how it works, how to implement it, and how you can get value out of it right now.
11:50–12:30 Thursday, 29/10/2015
James Turnbull (Empatico)
Docker has been one of the runaway successes in infrastructure tools. Some of that is hype, but Docker has seen huge adoption by both developers and operations people. This isn't a talk about marketing or about using Docker. It's a talk about the lessons we've learned from building developer and sysadmin-facing tools.
9:30–11:00 Wednesday, 28/10/2015
John Willis (Docker)
This session is a comprehensive overview of Docker. We will cover all the basics of the product. By the end of this session you should be able to install Docker, run Docker containers, and build images. If time permits we will also cover Docker Machine, Compose, and Swarm.
11:30–13:00 Wednesday, 28/10/2015
John Willis (Docker)
This session is a comprehensive overview of Docker. We will cover all the basics of the product. By the end of this session you should be able to install Docker, run Docker containers, and build images. If time permits we will also cover Docker Machine, Compose, and Swarm.
14:00–15:30 Wednesday, 28/10/2015
Philip Tellis (SOASTA), Nic Jansma (SOASTA)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Investigating performance problems often requires more than one tool to nail down the problem. In fact, using the wrong tools can often take you completely in the wrong direction. In this talk, we will walk through a real situation we recently dealt with to identify the cause of a performance problem using RUM, Synthetic, and packet captures.
14:00–15:30 Wednesday, 28/10/2015
Joshua Hoffman (LeaseWeb)
Slides:   external link
The Makefile MicroVPS project: Using the tools included with Linux, build and deploy a virtual private server in a Linux container from scratch.
13:45–14:25 Friday, 30/10/2015
Alex Schoof (Fugue)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Secrets come in many shapes and sizes: database API keys, database passwords, private keys. Distributing and managing these secrets is usually an afterthought. It's hard to get right, and can be very expensive if you get it wrong. In this session, we'll look at the core operations and properties that make up a good secret management system, and how these principals can be implemented.
11:50–12:30 Friday, 30/10/2015
Philip Tellis (SOASTA), Nic Jansma (SOASTA)
Slides:   1-PDF 
It’s hard to tell when a new component of an SPA was requested as a result of an intentional user action or something else. Add on the various ways of building SPAs, ranging from raw XHR to Angular, Backbone, and sometimes all of the above, and you have an interesting problem in traffic analysis. Find out how boomerang measures the performance of SPAs in a way that works for real websites.
11:50–12:30 Friday, 30/10/2015
Patrick Debois (Small Town Heroes)
Slides:   external link
In the mobile world continuous delivery is rare. A lot has to do with the emerging/changing mobile toolset. In this presentation I want to give: - An overview of the current available toolset to automate almost everything in the delivery process - How to get valuable feedback from production back to the developers - How this relates to DevOps and a better feedback cycle
14:40–15:20 Friday, 30/10/2015
Slides:   1-PDF 
Performance is a journey, not a destination. Your takeaway from this talk will be a detailed understanding of one company’s impressive performance journey — the inspiration that kickstarted it, the roadblocks it encountered, the tools that made the journey easier, the rewards of sticking it out, and what the road ahead looks like.
11:50–12:30 Thursday, 29/10/2015
Baron Schwartz (VividCortex)
Slides:   1-PDF 
If you're monitoring a lot of data in an event stream (as VividCortex does query traffic monitoring, for example), sampling the stream usefully can be a hard problem. There are all sorts of edge cases and bad consequences. This talk explains how a sketch -- a probabilistic data structure -- turned out to be the answer for us.
14:00–15:30 Wednesday, 28/10/2015
Björn Rabenstein (SoundCloud), Julius Volz (SoundCloud)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Prometheus is a popular open-source monitoring system and time series database written in Go. It features a multi-dimensional data model, a flexible query language, and integrates aspects all the way from client-side instrumentation to alerting. Participants in this tutorial will instrument a toy service and set up all critical components of the Prometheus ecosystem.
16:00–17:30 Wednesday, 28/10/2015
Björn Rabenstein (SoundCloud), Julius Volz (SoundCloud)
Slides:   external link
Prometheus is a popular open-source monitoring system and time series database written in Go. It features a multi-dimensional data model, a flexible query language, and integrates aspects all the way from client-side instrumentation to alerting. Participants in this tutorial will instrument a toy service and set up all critical components of the Prometheus ecosystem.
16:10–16:50 Thursday, 29/10/2015
James Brooks (Betfair)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
When used properly, time series metrics can form the backbone of an enterprise monitoring system. James Brooks from Betfair will talk about their internal use of OpenTSDB, and about a new tool (OpenTSP) they have developed to streamline and automate metric gathering and distribution across the enterprise.
16:10–16:50 Thursday, 29/10/2015
Ryn Daniels (Etsy)
The principles of DevOps can be beneficial to everyone involved in software development, not just development and operations teams. This talk will discuss practical ideas for how DevOps principles can be used throughout an organization, and the benefits of spreading operational thinking further than just the Ops (or DevOps) team.