Build resilient systems at scale
28–30 October 2015 • Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Speaker Slides & Video

Presentation slides will be made available after the session has concluded and the speaker has given us the files. Check back if you don't see the file you're looking for—it might be available later! (However, please note some speakers choose not to share their presentations.)

Anna Shipman (Government Digital Service)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Hosting is one of the most time-consuming barriers for new digital services, and usually involves duplicating work done elsewhere. I’ve been leading a team prototyping a PaaS for the UK government as a potential solution to that. This talk will share what we’ve learnt so far and discuss some of the main challenges for building a PaaS in government.
Julien SIMON (AWS), Antoine Guy (Viadeo)
Slides:   external link
Viadeo is the #1 professional social network in France with over 9 million members. In early 2015, we decided to migrate 100% of our physical infrastructure (about 250 servers with a strong backend flavor) to Amazon Web Services. Covering both technical and non-technical topics, this presentation is a real-life account of everything that went right or wrong.
Steve Workman (Yell)
Slides:   external link
In a world where responsive web design is common, how can the old guard keep pace? Is there still room for adaptive web design in the increasingly responsive web, and can it perform better for your users and your organisation? Steve explores how Yell takes an adaptive approach to keep performance high.
Terry Bernstein (Verisign)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
New cloud-based GSLB services can elevate global load balancing from a supporting technical role to a versatile, cost-effective solution for meeting strategic business goals and gaining a competitive advantage. This presentation will review how, using the Lua programming language, one can utilize a DDoS-resilient, cloud-based service to implement advanced GSLB scenarios.
Sarah Wells (Financial Times)
Slides:   1-PDF 
You've heard all about what microservices can do for you. You're convinced. So you build some. Reasoning about your functionality is way easier: these services are so simple! Then you get to the point where you have 35 microservices, and all the monitoring and alerting tactics you used for your monoliths are a complete disaster. Something needs to change and this talk will explain what and how.
Bart De Vylder (CoScale)
Slides:   1-PDF 
With the overload of metrics from your users, applications, and systems, keeping track of performance can be a daunting task. In this session we discuss how to apply data science techniques to technical and business metrics, in order to understand performance anomalies and their impact on your business.
Frederieke Ubels (bol.com), William de Ronde (bol.com)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Bol.com has been growing bigger and faster for years, with all the growing pains of more people, a larger and more complex landscape, sharing codebases, more and more dependencies, and bottlenecks. You’re always waiting for somebody, and there’s always somebody waiting for you. To battle this we decided to enable everybody to implement their own vision on DevOps – a great journey towards autonomy!
Doug Sillars (AT&T)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
In the rush to market, even the best ideas can be implemented poorly. Poorly performing apps lead to unhappy customers, bad reviews, and app uninstalls. In this talk, we’ll look at examples of innovative app ideas that were implemented without thought to performance, or the impact to customers, and we’ll look at ways to prevent such mistakes in the future.
Adam Onishi (Financial Times)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Is our fascination with new tools breaking the inherent robustness of the web? Or, can these new tools help progressive enhancement mean something more? My aim is to take a look at the current state of the web, at whether progressive enhancement is still plausible. I also look at how this effects the way we approach the basics of the web, like performance and accessibility.
Bridget Kromhout (Pivotal)
Slides:   external link
What is your platform? Everyone has one, whether it's Docker wrapped in config management wrapped in thousand-line fabfiles, bespoke artisanal hand-crafted shell scripts… or both! What promises can your platform make and keep? We craft platforms specific to our needs. I'll talk about where I've been (spoiler alert: containers in production without hype) and what I've learned on this journey.
Simon Hearne (NCC Group)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Web performance is a complex topic, and in our attempts to understand it we’re collecting more and more data. How can we distil this data to make it concise and meaningful in a business context? Simon will explore a number of visualisations beyond waterfall charts, weighing the pros and cons of each, to help you decide what is useful for your business.
Nathan Bower (Zillow)
Slides:   external link
Performance budgets lend a relatively simple safety net that enables designers and developers to build engaging features, while supporting optimal performance or reaching for higher performance goals. I'll discuss how to create good performance budgets, why it's important to have them in place, and tell a true story of how Zillow was able to respond quickly in a case when budgets were exceeded.
Lindsay Holmwood (Australian Government Digital Transformation Office)
Slides:   external link
"Fail fast, fail often" is a tech industry mantra. But what's the point of embracing failure if we're not learning anything from it? The language we use and views we hold when talking about failure shape the outcome of that discussion, and how we learn in the future. Let's talk about how to learn better about What Went Wrong and minimise blame in our organisations.
Matt Peterson (Cumulus Networks)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Networking is the last major compute infrastructure that is closed or dominated by proprietary vendors. In the last few years the industry has seen a dramatic shift into opening up – from hardware, protocols, and software in general. This talk will examine various efforts within the open networking space and how these may be applicable to your own needs. Will DevOps reach layer 2 & 3? Find out!
Slides:   1-PDF 
In his talk, Cor will address the execution gap with three main practices that stand out for cloud software capability and how to introduce them in parallel with cloud adoption. He will focus on DevOps enabling organizations to achieve faster time to market and/or time to value. The session will explore real use cases to determine how to best keep up with cloud.
Slides:   1-PDF 
Find out how adding a robot to your chat channel can increase communication between team members and the tools they use. Featuring Hubot, the friendly open source robot from GitHub.
Stijn Polfliet (CoScale)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
With the rise of DevOps and continuous deployments, performance monitoring serves a bigger purpose than helping to keep our systems and applications fast and available. "Continuous performance monitoring" allows us to document performance as new deployment changes occur; prioritize performance enhancements; and quantify the performance and business impact of new deployments.
Mike Amundsen (API Academy, CA Technologies)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Most of us know about Conway's adage "Any organization will produce a design which is a copy of the organization's communication structure." But Conway coined four laws in his 1968 paper "How Committees Invent." What are the other ones? Why are we not talking about them? And what do they tell us about optimizing teams in a distributed world?
Jakub Pawlowicz (Independent Consultant)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Clean-css is one of the most popular node.js tools these days. We'll take a closer look at how it works and different optimization angles it provides to optimize CSS content. We will also cover how emerging web technologies, HTTP/2 and Service Workers, will affect CSS optimizations techniques in a long run.
Sophie Shepherd (Ushahidi)
Slides:   external link
The Ushahidi platform is a data collection tool that has been used by over 18 million people in 150 countries, and translated into 49 different languages. As a designer on Ushahidi, Sophie will talk about the challenges of designing for global users with varying devices and connections, languages, and digital experiences, and will explain how a pattern library has made this process easier.
Slides:   1-PDF 
Teams deploying business-critical systems often spend a lot of time on the security of their code, but in the end, security is a property of human outcomes. Security design is the missing discipline that takes us from code to humans. Let's take a look at where it starts.
Maximiliano Firtman (ITMaster Professional Training)
Slides:   external link
In this tutorial we will first go through the state of the art in terms of mobile browsers and mobile web views available, including what you might not know about web engines on Android and iOS today. We will also look at how to measure mobile and responsive websites, and how to detect when you are seriously harming performance, with real examples on screen.
Jean-Pierre Vincent (BrainCracking)
Slides:   external link
My daily pleasure as a performance engineer is to use all the tricks in the book to speed up interface rendering and keep it fluid. But performance is actually a UX problem, and sometimes our voodoo is not enough - we have to use real magic tricks. Because perception is key, my favorite UX designer and I review all the non-techie options to speed up our service. Well, to fake it.
Slides:   external link
Finding slow nodes in large clusters is akin to finding a needle in a haystack; hence, manual identification of slow/bad nodes is not practical. The focus of this talk is to present a statistical approach to automatically detect slow/bad nodes, thereby mitigating user impact.
Philip Tellis (SOASTA), Nic Jansma (SOASTA)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Investigating performance problems often requires more than one tool to nail down the problem. In fact, using the wrong tools can often take you completely in the wrong direction. In this talk, we will walk through a real situation we recently dealt with to identify the cause of a performance problem using RUM, Synthetic, and packet captures.
Klaus Enzenhofer (Dynatrace)
Still excluding bot traffic from your monitoring data? Ever looked at what search engine robots do to your environment? Ever built a set of landing pages for Google? Ever had a discussion with marketing folks on Search Engine Optimization? User Experience Management is still relevant but today it is also about Robot Crawl Experience.
Joshua Hoffman (LeaseWeb)
Slides:   external link
The Makefile MicroVPS project: Using the tools included with Linux, build and deploy a virtual private server in a Linux container from scratch.
Alex Schoof (Fugue)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Secrets come in many shapes and sizes: database API keys, database passwords, private keys. Distributing and managing these secrets is usually an afterthought. It's hard to get right, and can be very expensive if you get it wrong. In this session, we'll look at the core operations and properties that make up a good secret management system, and how these principals can be implemented.
Phil Stanhope (Dyn )
Slides:   1-PPTX 
How well are the providers of your online infrastructure working? What happens if they have a transient outage? Will you even know? Is a RUM waterfall telling you why page assets are sometimes slow and sometimes fast?
Hooman Beheshti (Fastly)
Slides:   1-PDF 
In this session, we'll examine the challenges around measuring CDN performance and focus on the different methods for measurement. We'll discuss what to measure, important metrics to focus on, and different ways that numbers may mislead you.
Philip Tellis (SOASTA), Nic Jansma (SOASTA)
Slides:   1-PDF 
It’s hard to tell when a new component of an SPA was requested as a result of an intentional user action or something else. Add on the various ways of building SPAs, ranging from raw XHR to Angular, Backbone, and sometimes all of the above, and you have an interesting problem in traffic analysis. Find out how boomerang measures the performance of SPAs in a way that works for real websites.
Patrick Debois (Small Town Heroes)
Slides:   external link
In the mobile world continuous delivery is rare. A lot has to do with the emerging/changing mobile toolset. In this presentation I want to give: - An overview of the current available toolset to automate almost everything in the delivery process - How to get valuable feedback from production back to the developers - How this relates to DevOps and a better feedback cycle
Slides:   1-PDF 
Performance is a journey, not a destination. Your takeaway from this talk will be a detailed understanding of one company’s impressive performance journey — the inspiration that kickstarted it, the roadblocks it encountered, the tools that made the journey easier, the rewards of sticking it out, and what the road ahead looks like.
Tanay Nagjee (Electric Cloud), Anders Wallgren (Electric Cloud)
Slides:   1-PDF 
To improve developer productivity and resource utilization – and to enable enterprise-scale, cross-project visibility and shorter time to market – many organizations are working to automate and orchestrate the entire tool chain across the end-to-end delivery pipeline. In this session, attendees will learn how a $40 billion company (Huawei) did just that.
Steve Souders (SpeedCurve), Mark Zeman (SpeedCurve)
We all love using things that are fast, but the challenge for Velocity attendees is how to make things fast. Sometimes it's best just to listen to that little performance voice in your head.
Baron Schwartz (VividCortex)
Slides:   1-PDF 
If you're monitoring a lot of data in an event stream (as VividCortex does query traffic monitoring, for example), sampling the stream usefully can be a hard problem. There are all sorts of edge cases and bad consequences. This talk explains how a sketch -- a probabilistic data structure -- turned out to be the answer for us.
Mark Heistek (ING), Taco Bakker (ING)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Continuous Delivery did not end as described in the Continuous Delivery book. Key learnings and experiences of implementing Continuous Delivery at scale are shared.
John Allspaw (Adaptive Capacity Labs)
Having spent a large part of my career leading operations and infrastructure teams, I hadn’t yet found satisfying answers to these questions: What makes them good at this? What is necessary to help them get better?
Björn Rabenstein (SoundCloud), Julius Volz (SoundCloud)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Prometheus is a popular open-source monitoring system and time series database written in Go. It features a multi-dimensional data model, a flexible query language, and integrates aspects all the way from client-side instrumentation to alerting. Participants in this tutorial will instrument a toy service and set up all critical components of the Prometheus ecosystem.
Björn Rabenstein (SoundCloud), Julius Volz (SoundCloud)
Slides:   external link
Prometheus is a popular open-source monitoring system and time series database written in Go. It features a multi-dimensional data model, a flexible query language, and integrates aspects all the way from client-side instrumentation to alerting. Participants in this tutorial will instrument a toy service and set up all critical components of the Prometheus ecosystem.
James Brooks (Betfair)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
When used properly, time series metrics can form the backbone of an enterprise monitoring system. James Brooks from Betfair will talk about their internal use of OpenTSDB, and about a new tool (OpenTSP) they have developed to streamline and automate metric gathering and distribution across the enterprise.
Guy Podjarny (Snyk), Assaf Hefetz (Snyk)
A modern web application today is made up of 90 percent third-party code. We use third-party modules, platforms, domains, and more to get our applications running quickly and well. However, we often overlook the threat involved in running someone else’s code as though we wrote it ourselves. Each such piece of code may be malicious, compromised, or have vulnerabilities - and we’d be none the wiser.
Scott Jenson (Google)
The web's superpower, nearly instant interaction with just a tap, could revolutionize smart devices: you could walk up and use anything. But is the web locked in a virtual world? What if we could populate the physical world with URLs so EVERYTHING could have a virtual notecard of information? The Physical Web is an open standard that wants to fix that.
Adrian Mouat (Container Solutions)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The Docker container technology has received criticism from security researchers, especially regarding the isolation of containers and the provenance of images. In this talk I'll explain the main concerns around container security and offer some best practices and guidance for addressing them.
Mark Vanderwiele (IBM Corporation)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This session will use a PaaS and services to demonstrate how to create and rapidly deliver intelligent applications that understand voice commands, develop deeper dialog with users, and control devices or actions.