Prepare to Design the Future
March 19–20, 2017: Training
March 20–22, 2017: Tutorials & Conference
San Francisco, CA

Schedule: Beyond the screen sessions

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11:20am–12:00pm Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Location: Grand Ballroom
Level: Intermediate
Mike Haley (Autodesk, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.22, 9 ratings)
Mike Haley explores how machine learning (aka artificial intelligence) is changing how designers build products and how people experience them—a transformation driven by advances in computer science that enable designers to remove barriers to creativity, making it easier and faster to create than ever before. Read more.
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1:15pm–1:55pm Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Location: California West
Level: Beginner
Sarah Gold (Projects by IF)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
Companies use our data in thousands of ways but only ask permission to with one: getting us to click "agree" to a jargon-rich list of terms and conditions. It’s not good enough, and users know it. Sarah Gold discusses projects that offer new models of consent and explores how people respond when you give them more agency over the data they generate. Read more.
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2:05pm–2:45pm Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Location: Olympic Room
Tags: sponsored
Marieke McCloskey (UserTesting)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 4 ratings)
Marieke McCloskey shares advice on how to build products that people love by spending time in the product discovery phase: understanding who your users are, what they need, and how they might use and react to your product. Along the way, Marieke outlines fast and affordable ways to understand your customers and validate design concepts through remote research. Read more.
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3:35pm–4:15pm Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Location: Grand Ballroom
Level: Non-technical
Andra Keay (Silicon Valley Robotics)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
As robots become reality, there are calls for us to design ethical "good" robots—but all we really need are good design principles for robots. Andra Keay introduces five principles for good robot design drawn from the best thinking in human-robot interaction (purpose, predictability, transparency, durability, and honesty) illustrated by examples of robotics best practices. Read more.
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11:20am–12:00pm Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Location: Tower Salon A
Level: Intermediate
Steve Portigal (Portigal Consulting)
Average rating: ***..
(3.56, 9 ratings)
War stories about contextual user research and the inevitable mishaps that ensue are in turn bizarre, comic, tragic, and generally astonishing. Steve Portigal shares some of the best stories he's collected, examining the patterns and lessons they reveal. Read more.
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1:15pm–1:55pm Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Location: Tower Salon A
Level: Intermediate
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
What happens when the trolley problem is applied to an autonomous car? What happens when the robot nanny has to discipline a child? Algorithms and the IoT are not neutral or impartial—they inherit the biases and assumptions we train them for. Gretchen Anderson explores the challenges we face when designing the user experiences of the complex behavioral agents that increasingly run our lives. Read more.
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2:05pm–2:45pm Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Location: California East
Level: Intermediate
Desiree Garcia (IBM Watson)
Average rating: **...
(2.50, 2 ratings)
Desiree Garcia shares a case study of using IBM Watson to build a bot to help Nike+ customers troubleshoot their products. Along the way, Desiree demonstrates the urgent importance of designing with content first and outlines the ways that even advanced bots can leave people helpless in very serious situations. Read more.
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2:05pm–2:45pm Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Location: Georgian
Level: Intermediate
Pamela Pavliscak (SoundingBox)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 6 ratings)
The technology we use every day knows a lot about what we do. But so far, it doesn’t know much about how we feel. That’s changing as emotion-sensing technology moves from the experimental phase to reality. Pamela Pavliscak explores what makes for a rich emotional experience and why, even if we make our technology invisible, the connection will still be emotional. Read more.
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3:35pm–4:15pm Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Location: California East
Level: Non-technical
Jody Medich (Singularity University)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Virtual reality has great entertainment potential, but that's just the beginning. Because VR provides all of our visual sense, it has magical abilities to actively rewire the brain to provide superhuman healing powers for everything from PTSD to paralysis to recovery from strokes. Jody Medich discusses the how and why and explores the untapped potential for this technology beyond entertainment. Read more.
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3:35pm–4:15pm Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Location: Tower Salon A
Level: Beginner
Ame Elliott (Simply Secure), Elizabeth Goodman (18F / General Services Administration), Adrienne Porter Felt (Google), Jennifer King (UC Berkeley School of Information)
Average rating: **...
(2.50, 6 ratings)
If users don’t trust a product, they won’t use it. Too often, security and privacy are treated only as engineering problems—not problems involving design. Using examples from large-scale software deployments with more than a billion users, this panel deconstructs UX microinteractions—details giving immediate feedback—that communicate security and shares tips for designing trustable interactions. Read more.
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3:35pm–4:15pm Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Location: Georgian
Level: Beginner
Aye Moah (Boomerang)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 4 ratings)
Conversations about designing for artificial intelligence often start and end with replacing the humans, but few explore the potential of AI working alongside people to augment our intelligence. Aye Moah shares lessons learned from the design process behind Boomerang Respondable, the world’s first AI assistant that works with people to help them write better emails. Read more.