Prepare to Design the Future
March 19–20, 2017: Training
March 20–22, 2017: Tutorials & Conference
San Francisco, CA
 
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      California East
      Add The robots are coming to your personal schedule
      11:20am The robots are coming Dan Saffer (Saffervescence Inc.)
      Add Wielding the soft (and hard) science of service design to your personal schedule
      1:15pm Wielding the soft (and hard) science of service design Brandon  Schauer  (Adaptive Path at Capital One)
      Add Virtual reality beyond entertainment to your personal schedule
      3:35pm Virtual reality beyond entertainment Jody Medich (Singularity University)
      California West
      Add Lessons learned designing Allbirds to your personal schedule
      11:20am Lessons learned designing Allbirds Simon Endres (Red Antler)
      Add Design for sustainability to your personal schedule
      1:15pm Design for sustainability Tim Frick (Mightybytes, Inc.)
      Add The future of enterprise software design to your personal schedule
      2:05pm The future of enterprise software design Amanda Linden (Facebook)
      Add UX, brand, and crossing disciplines to your personal schedule
      4:25pm UX, brand, and crossing disciplines Daniel Soltis (Moving Brands)
      Tower Salon A
      Add User research war stories to your personal schedule
      11:20am User research war stories Steve Portigal (Portigal Consulting)
      Add Designing smart things: Balancing ethics and choice to your personal schedule
      1:15pm Designing smart things: Balancing ethics and choice Gretchen Anderson (PG&E)
      Add Guaranteed successful design to your personal schedule
      2:05pm Guaranteed successful design Noah Iliinsky (Amazon Web Services)
      Add Designing trustable products: Microinteractions matter for secure UX to your personal schedule
      3:35pm Designing trustable products: Microinteractions matter for secure UX Ame Elliott (Simply Secure), Elizabeth Goodman (18F / General Services Administration), Adrienne Porter Felt (Google), Jennifer King (UC Berkeley School of Information)
      Add Data visualizations that expand your visual literacy to your personal schedule
      4:25pm Data visualizations that expand your visual literacy Julie Rodriguez (Eagle Investment Systems)
      Grand Ballroom
      Add Wednesday opening welcome to your personal schedule
      Grand Ballroom
      9:00am Wednesday opening welcome Mary Treseler (O'Reilly Media), Leah Buley (Leah Buley Co.)
      Add Working backwards to your personal schedule
      9:05am Working backwards Alan Cooper (Cooper )
      Add Government services that work for people to your personal schedule
      9:50am Government services that work for people Jennifer Pahlka (Code for America)
      Add Fireside chat with John Allspaw and Randy Hunt to your personal schedule
      10:10am Fireside chat with John Allspaw and Randy Hunt John Allspaw (Etsy), Randy Hunt (Etsy)
      Add Org design for design orgs to your personal schedule
      11:20am Org design for design orgs Kristin Skinner (Capital One)
      Georgian
      Add Designing for diversity in design organizations to your personal schedule
      11:20am Designing for diversity in design organizations Eli Silva (Pivotal Labs), Molly Beyer (University of North Texas)
      Add From 6 to 126 in four years to your personal schedule
      1:15pm From 6 to 126 in four years Alastair Simpson (Atlassian)
      Add When your internet-connected things know how you feel to your personal schedule
      2:05pm When your internet-connected things know how you feel Pamela Pavliscak (SoundingBox)
      4:25pm
      7:30am Morning Coffee Service | Room: Colonial Room/Italian Room (Sponsor Pavilion)
      Add Wednesday Speed Networking to your personal schedule
      8:15am Wednesday Speed Networking | Room: Georgian
      10:45am Morning Break Sponsored by Adobe | Room: Colonial Room/Italian Room (Sponsor Pavilion)
      2:45pm Afternoon Break | Room: Foyers
      Add Wednesday lunch and Birds of a Feather sessions to your personal schedule
      12:00pm Wednesday lunch and Birds of a Feather sessions | Room: Elizabethan AB, Elizabethan CD, and Alexandra's
      11:20am-12:00pm (40m)
      The robots are coming
      Dan Saffer (Saffervescence Inc.)
      Safety, privacy, displaying robot intent, cooperation, and movement between humans and robots—all of these need to be considered when designing social robots. Drawing on his experience designing Kuri, a home robot just launched at CES 2017, Dan Saffer shares lessons learned about designing robots.
      1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Bridging design, technology, and business
      Wielding the soft (and hard) science of service design
      Brandon  Schauer  (Adaptive Path at Capital One)
      We map and measure customer journeys but often stumble at what should be done next to deliver great service experience atop complex systems and organizations. Brandon Schauer demonstrates that the paths forward are knowable and can be practiced with rigor if we understand and apply the soft—and sometimes hard—science of service design.
      2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Beyond the screen
      Bots may solve some of our problems; here's how they'll put us on the hook for others
      Desiree Garcia (IBM Watson)
      Desiree Garcia shares a case study of using IBM Watson to build a bot to help Nike+ customers troubleshoot their products. Along the way, Desiree demonstrates the urgent importance of designing with content first and outlines the ways that even advanced bots can leave people helpless in very serious situations.
      3:35pm-4:15pm (40m) Beyond the screen
      Virtual reality beyond entertainment
      Jody Medich (Singularity University)
      Virtual reality has great entertainment potential, but that's just the beginning. Because VR provides all of our visual sense, it has magical abilities to actively rewire the brain to provide superhuman healing powers for everything from PTSD to paralysis to recovery from strokes. Jody Medich discusses the how and why and explores the untapped potential for this technology beyond entertainment.
      4:25pm-5:05pm (40m) Technology, tools, and process
      Lessons learned from the Highway1 hardware accelerator
      Rafi Ajl (Highway1)
      Things don’t come into the world as fully formed awesome expressions: they are the result of a rigorous design process. Rafi Ajl shares lessons learned from 40 hardware teams who have gone through the Highway1 accelerator—enabling you to listen to people and the world around you and chase down the insights that differentiate the merely good from the truly great.
      11:20am-12:00pm (40m)
      Lessons learned designing Allbirds
      Simon Endres (Red Antler)
      Simon Endres shares his experience creating the brand for the NZ-inspired, SF-based footwear company Allbirds.
      1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Bridging design, technology, and business
      Design for sustainability
      Tim Frick (Mightybytes, Inc.)
      The internet is becoming the world’s largest source of CO2 emissions. 560,000 agencies around the world make daily design decisions on behalf of their clients, directly impacting internet sustainability. Tim Frick explains how to apply sustainability principles to the process of designing digital products and services, helping you make better decisions on behalf of people and the planet.
      2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Bridging design, technology, and business
      The future of enterprise software design
      Amanda Linden (Facebook)
      The future of enterprise design is one where users have a strong connection with the brand of the products they are using. At the same time, future enterprise products will make you feel closer to your coworkers, even as teams become more distributed across the globe. Amanda Linden explains what your product team should prioritize and how to ensure your user experience investments are successful.
      3:35pm-4:15pm (40m) Bridging design, technology, and business
      New realms for NASA's mission control visualization software: Design thinking and open source
      Jay Trimble (NASA Ames Research Center)
      Jay Trimble explains how design thinking was applied to user software for NASA's mission control systems and how NASA has been able to build a design-informed organization of stakeholders by mapping existing mental models from system engineering to design thinking.
      4:25pm-5:05pm (40m) Bridging design, technology, and business
      UX, brand, and crossing disciplines
      Daniel Soltis (Moving Brands)
      While branding is often viewed as graphic design, it is intertwined with user experience: a brand identity is a tool that practitioners use when designing a range of experiences. Daniel Soltis explains how attitudes, skills, and practices from UX design can inform brand design and, more generally, what it looks like to take lessons from one discipline and apply them to a new context.
      11:20am-12:00pm (40m) Beyond the screen
      User research war stories
      Steve Portigal (Portigal Consulting)
      War stories about contextual user research and the inevitable mishaps that ensue are in turn bizarre, comic, tragic, and generally astonishing. Steve Portigal shares some of the best stories he's collected, examining the patterns and lessons they reveal.
      1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Beyond the screen
      Designing smart things: Balancing ethics and choice
      Gretchen Anderson (PG&E)
      What happens when the trolley problem is applied to an autonomous car? What happens when the robot nanny has to discipline a child? Algorithms and the IoT are not neutral or impartial—they inherit the biases and assumptions we train them for. Gretchen Anderson explores the challenges we face when designing the user experiences of the complex behavioral agents that increasingly run our lives.
      2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Bridging design, technology, and business
      Guaranteed successful design
      Noah Iliinsky (Amazon Web Services)
      Noah Iliinsky offers a quick survey of 17 design approaches and conversations you've never heard of—or aren't using sufficiently—enabling you to find the right problems to solve and solve them well. . .or at least better than you can now.
      3:35pm-4:15pm (40m) Beyond the screen
      Designing trustable products: Microinteractions matter for secure UX
      Ame Elliott (Simply Secure), Elizabeth Goodman (18F / General Services Administration), Adrienne Porter Felt (Google), Jennifer King (UC Berkeley School of Information)
      If users don’t trust a product, they won’t use it. Too often, security and privacy are treated only as engineering problems—not problems involving design. Using examples from large-scale software deployments with more than a billion users, this panel deconstructs UX microinteractions—details giving immediate feedback—that communicate security and shares tips for designing trustable interactions.
      4:25pm-5:05pm (40m) Bridging design, technology, and business
      Data visualizations that expand your visual literacy
      Julie Rodriguez (Eagle Investment Systems)
      Your data can be key to the success of your decisions and communications, but without proper data visualizations that provide context and accurate representation of the numbers, communications can be misguided. Julie Rodriguez draws upon examples from her book Visualizing Financial Data to show you how to turn your raw data into meaningful information.
      9:00am-9:05am (5m)
      Wednesday opening welcome
      Mary Treseler (O'Reilly Media), Leah Buley (Leah Buley Co.)
      Program chairs Mary Treseler and Leah Buley welcome you to the second day of keynotes.
      9:05am-9:30am (25m)
      Working backwards
      Alan Cooper (Cooper )
      Using examples from his award-winning design consultancy, Alan Cooper shares the secret to his success: working backwards. Working backwards means taking the time to ask the hard questions before wading into unfamiliar territory. It can be scary (and for some, frustrating), but it's the only way to innovate.
      9:30am-9:50am (20m)
      Should designers. . .? New design skills from coding to Agile, process, and more
      Dan Mall (SuperFriendly)
      It's no longer enough to be a Photoshop master. Designers need to grow their skills in order to stay relevant and effective. But which skills are worth focusing on? Drawing on his experience, Dan Mall shares stories and perspectives on whether designers should code, how designers can fit into Agile workflows, the role a designer has in creating, using, and maintaining design systems, and more.
      9:50am-10:10am (20m)
      Government services that work for people
      Jennifer Pahlka (Code for America)
      Poor service design can have devastating consequences for vulnerable people in our country, but it doesn't have to be that way. Jennifer Pahlka explains why intentionally designing government interfaces, especially for low-income people, not only improves social outcomes but costs taxpayers dramatically less. Designing for users isn't just how to make great technology; it's how to govern.
      10:10am-10:40am (30m)
      Fireside chat with John Allspaw and Randy Hunt
      John Allspaw (Etsy), Randy Hunt (Etsy)
      Things change—in the world around us, in our hearts and minds, in our organizations, in what to work on, in how to work together, and how to deliver that work. Etsy’s vice president of design Randy J. Hunt and CTO John Allspaw discuss the emergent and learned practices and behaviors that have enabled their teams to support one another and evolve together.
      10:40am-10:45am (5m)
      Wednesday closing remarks
      Program chairs Mary Treseler and Leah Buley close the second day of keynotes.
      11:20am-12:00pm (40m)
      Org design for design orgs
      Kristin Skinner (Capital One)
      As the move to establish in-house design teams accelerates, there's very little common wisdom on what makes for a successful design organization. Design requires not just process and methods but savvy with organizational and operational matters. Kristin Skinner shine a light on the unsung activities of actually running a design team, exploring what works and what doesn't.
      11:20am-12:00pm (40m) Bridging design, technology, and business
      Designing for diversity in design organizations
      Eli Silva (Pivotal Labs), Molly Beyer (University of North Texas)
      Who designs designers? Who designs design organizations? Is UX empathy only skin deep? Do you believe in a world where everyone matters? Eli Silva and Molly Beyer outline ways to design cultures that support design thinking, organizational growth, and diversity in the workplace. Join in to learn how to develop career paths for your team and discover tips for inclusivity in design workspaces.
      1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Bridging design, technology, and business
      From 6 to 126 in four years
      Alastair Simpson (Atlassian)
      Within four years, Atlassian's design team has increased from 6 designers to 126. Building and managing a design team of this size is one thing; integrating it into a traditionally engineering-led organization is another. Alastair Simpson shares how Atlassian has successfully embraced design as a first-class discipline and is transitioning from an engineering- to an experience-led company.
      2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Beyond the screen
      When your internet-connected things know how you feel
      Pamela Pavliscak (SoundingBox)
      The technology we use every day knows a lot about what we do. But so far, it doesn’t know much about how we feel. That’s changing as emotion-sensing technology moves from the experimental phase to reality. Pamela Pavliscak explores what makes for a rich emotional experience and why, even if we make our technology invisible, the connection will still be emotional.
      3:35pm-4:15pm (40m) Beyond the screen
      Designing for intelligence augmentation: How to design products that use artificial intelligence effectively
      Aye Moah (Boomerang)
      Conversations about designing for artificial intelligence often start and end with replacing the humans, but few explore the potential of AI working alongside people to augment our intelligence. Aye Moah shares lessons learned from the design process behind Boomerang Respondable, the world’s first AI assistant that works with people to help them write better emails.
      4:25pm-5:05pm (40m)
      Session
      7:30am-9:00am (1h 30m)
      Break: Morning Coffee Service
      8:15am-8:45am (30m) Event
      Wednesday Speed Networking
      Meet us before the opening keynotes on Wednesday morning and get to know fellow attendees in quick 60-second discussions.
      10:45am-11:20am (35m)
      Break: Morning Break Sponsored by Adobe
      2:45pm-3:35pm (50m)
      Break: Afternoon Break
      12:00pm-1:15pm (1h 15m)
      Wednesday lunch and Birds of a Feather sessions
      During lunch, you'll have the chance to participate in a Birds of a Feather session with like-minded people.