October 19, 2016
San Francisco, CA
Lili Cheng

Lili Cheng
Corporate Vice President and Distinguished Engineer, AI and Research Division, Microsoft

Website | @lilich

Conversational interfaces are a novel way to interact with computers. Human language is becoming the new user interface, bots the new apps, personal digital assistants the new browsers. These layers are built on artificial intelligence that’s made breathtaking progress in the last few years.

We’ve invited Lili Cheng, who is helping spearhead Microsoft’s conversation-as-a-platform strategy, to summarize Bot Day. Drawing on observations from Xiaoice, Microsoft’s extraordinarily popular Chinese chatbot, and its American sibling Tay, whose learning capabilities were corrupted by trolls, Lili will reflect on the way that humans are embracing their bot counterparts.

—Jon Bruner, Program Chair

Lili Cheng is a general manager for Microsoft Research focusing on conversational experiences, bots, and intelligence systems. Lili’s team is responsible for the Microsoft Bot Framework (part of Cortana Intelligence) as well as bringing together the community of bot creators, channels, tools, and AI experts in events such as Botness, Microsoft Research’s Design Expo, and the Social Computing Symposium. Previously, Lili was director of user experience for Microsoft Windows and also worked in Apple Computer’s Advanced Technology group on the user interface research team, where she focused on Quicktime conferencing and Quicktime VR. Lili is a registered architect; she worked in Tokyo and Los Angeles for Nihon Sekkei and Skidmore Owings and Merrill on commercial urban design and large-scale building projects. She has taught in NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications program as well as at Harvard University.

Sessions

4:30pm–5:20pm Wednesday, 10/19/2016
Lili Cheng (Microsoft)
Conversational interfaces are a novel way to interact with computers. Human language is becoming the new user interface, bots the new apps, and personal digital assistants the new browsers. Lili Cheng, an architect who directs the Microsoft Research Lab behind Xiaoice and Tay, will reflect on human reactions to our bot counterparts. Read more.