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Alasdair Allan

Alasdair Allan
Director, Babilim Light Industries

Website | @aallan

Alasdair Allan is a scientist, author, hacker, tinkerer, and journalist who has recently been spending a lot of time thinking about the Internet of Things, which he thinks is broken. He is the author of a number of books and sometimes also stands in front of cameras. You can often find him at conferences talking about interesting things or deploying sensors to measure them. A couple of years ago, he rolled out a mesh network of five hundred sensor motes covering the entirety of Moscone West during Google I/O. He’s still recovering. A few years before that, he caused a privacy scandal by uncovering that your iPhone was recording your location all the time, which caused several class-action lawsuits and a US Senate hearing. Some years on, he still isn’t sure what to think about that.

Alasdair sporadically writes blog posts about things that interest him or, more frequently, provides commentary in 140 characters or less. He is a contributing editor for Make magazine and a contributor to O’Reilly Radar. Alasdair is a former academic. As part of his work, he built a distributed peer-to-peer network of telescopes that, acting autonomously, reactively scheduled observations of time-critical events. Notable successes included contributing to the detection of what was—at the time—the most distant object yet discovered, a gamma-ray burster at a redshift of 8.2.


Moderated by:
James Turner (O'Reilly Media)
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries), Joe Bowser (Adobe Systems), Mike Wolfson (Epocrates)
Average rating: **...
(2.67, 3 ratings)
Until iOS and Android came along, the opportunities for open source to flourish in the mobile space were limited, because platforms were totally proprietary. Now you can find countless FL/OSS projects that help mobile developers get their job done. So what's on the horizon, and what are the best open source tools today to deliver the next great app? Read more.
Open Hardware
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 8 ratings)
Everyday things are becoming smarter. The problem? The things are becoming smarter, but they’re also becoming selfish and you’ve ended up as a mechanical turk inside your own software. How can we fix the Internet of Things? The things have to become not just smarter, but more co-operative, and the Internet of things needs to become anticipatory rather than reactive. Read more.