Design the Future
January 19–20, 2016: Training
January 20–22, 2016: Conference
San Francisco, CA

Speaker Slides & Video

Presentation slides will be made available after the session has concluded and the speaker has given us the files. Check back if you don't see the file you're looking for—it might be available later! (However, please note some speakers choose not to share their presentations.)

Doug Powell (IBM Design)
Slides:   1-PDF 
In 2013, IBM, one of the world’s largest technology companies, set the mission to create a sustainable culture of design. The goal: bring a human-centered focus to thousands of product and service experiences. Doug Powell offers a look at how this 350,000-employee company implemented Design Thinking and is addressing the needs of their users to deliver outcomes with speed and at scale.
Katie Dill (Airbnb)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Design is changing at a rapid clip—the next generation of companies are not just looking at how to give the pixels polish but focusing on creating and curating an amazing experience in the real world. Katie Dill demonstrates how to design for a multifaceted journey over time, how to identify when to own the experience and when to enable it, and how to build a team for depth and breadth.
Tony Fadell (Nest), Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media)
Details to come.
Robert Brunner (Ammunition)
Slides:   1-PDF 
If creating great design were easy, everyone would do it. The reality is that successful design takes an incredible commitment across an organization. So how do you embed great design practice in your culture? Robert Brunner, founder and partner at renowned design studio Ammunition, shares his experience creating meaningful products and services for Fortune 500 companies and startups alike.
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Developing interactive products and apps to help relaxation in children suffering from High function Autism. This also in turn helps them improve their communication and social skills. This product would also help people who suffer from Asperger syndrome and other such disabilities that require relaxation and helps promoting communication.
Roger Magoulas (O'Reilly Media)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Roger Magoulas covers key findings from the recent 2016 Design Salary and Tools Survey.
C Todd Lombardo (Fresh Tilled Soil)
Slides:   external link
A design sprint is a time-boxed, disciplined way to get validation on an idea to ensure you design something people need and/or want. C Todd Lombardo guides you through a mini-design sprint so you can get firsthand experience of what it's like to participate in one. You’ll walk away knowing how to implement them in your organization.
Danyel Smith (HRDCVR)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
We know it’s important as designers to serve a diverse society—to use our creative powers for good. One important step we can take is to change how people of color and people who live in socioeconomic distress are perceived and how they perceive themselves. Danyel Smith explains how HRDCVR is designed to be a luxury magazine true to the diverse society in which we all live.
Brandon Harris (Gaijin.com)
Slides:   1-PDF 
As more people find community on the Web, designers need to use patterns and principles that protect our users from harassment—or worse. Brandon Harris discusses how our design decisions can make life unpleasant—or even dangerous—for users of community tools. Brandon offers best practices for user safety and describes ways we can provide protection for our users.
Carl Bass (Autodesk)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Autodesk CEO Carl Bass talks about designing for our connected future. With sensors embedded all around us, data and design will need to converge to realize the promise of the Internet of Things (IoT). Carl examines the tools, techniques, and trends that will affect how things are made, with a particular focus on the connected products, buildings, and infrastructure hinted at by the IoT.
Pamela Pavliscak (Change Sciences)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The data shows that we can't escape data. Whether designer, developer, or researcher, this workshop is for everyone who wants to learn how to get more out of the ever-growing mountain of data to create a better user experience. Pamela Pavliscak explains how to combine data from analytics, social media, public datasets, diaries, usability tests, and more to inform design.
Claire Rowland (Independent)
Slides:   external link
Claire Rowland examines how the IoT breaks direct manipulation, the UX convention underpinning most successful consumer interfaces. This creates significant UX challenges. Claire explores how using the IoT is conceptually similar to programming and why that proves a challenge to many consumers.
Margaret Stewart (Facebook)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Margaret Stewart imparts four key principles for designing quality business products and explains why designing elegant tools may be the highest-impact opportunity that exists for designers today.
Suzanne Pellican (Intuit QuickBooks)
Slides:   external link
Suzanne Pellican explains how Intuit went from the "Best Run, No Growth Company in the Valley" to a "30-Year-Old Startup" by becoming design driven.
Erika Hall (Mule Design)
Slides:   1-PDF 
What is the world like now? What should it be like? While it's easy to get distracted by surface concerns, Erika Hall explains why we need to see design as the process of getting from "what is" to "what ought to be."
Adam Connor (Mad*Pow)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Real critique has become a lost skill. Critique is intended to help teams strengthen their designs, products, and services, not allow individual members to assert authority or push agendas under the guise of “feedback.” Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry discuss what critique really is and explain how to give it, get it, and use it to improve your team’s designs, communication, and collaboration.
Slides:   external link
Multiscreen experiences are powerful; we now divide our time between different devices based on context. At the same time, conversational assistants have evolved to be quite usable. But we’re just beginning to see how one assistant might work across an ecosystem of devices. Karen Kaushansky explores the future of designing with voice across multiple devices.
Maurice Woods (Inneract Project)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Traditional K–12 education offers most underserved students of color little to no access to design training. Inneract Project is set to change this by providing programming that exposes youth and their communities to various fields in design. Maurice Woods outlines Inneract Project, demonstrating the benefits of design education for students as well as the field itself.
Slides:   external link
GitHub has an abundance of quantitative data about what people are doing. Over the past two years, it has built a practice of qualitative research dedicated to uncovering the why. Qualitative research surfaces blind spots with product and customers and has changed the way GitHub ships features. Using three examples, Chrissie Brodigan shares how GitHub rolls features out as controlled experiments.
Mike Bracken (Co-operative Group), Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media)
Details to come.
Alastair Somerville (Acuity Design)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Understanding our own senses and how we create meaning is essential when designing for a world of hyper-user-centered devices that sense and talk to us, like wearables and the IoT. Alastair Somerville draws on his project knowledge and cognitive research to explore how we can rediscover our own senses and emotions to create frameworks for successful future product design.
Julia Zorzanello Byron (IBM Corporation), Omkar Chandgadkar (IBM Corporation)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Personas created for individual users fail to capture complex interactions between users of enterprise systems. Julia Zorzanello Byron and Omkar Chandgadkar show how they created team-based personas and aligned various silos of their product team by involving team members during synthesis. Attendees will learn how they can adopt this model to make better decisions with their product teams.
Bob Baxley (Independent)
Slides:   1-BIN 
Design has a “top of the funnel” problem: high school and college students are unaware of the intellectual and economic value of a career in design, despite the fact that design continues to be THE fundamental constraint on most technology companies. Bob Baxley helps you become an ambassador for design by providing the tools to inspire potential students to pursue a career in design.
Livia Labate (NPR/OpenNews)
Slides:   external link
Design practitioners are beginning to understand the practical utility of writing code as a way to make design happen, but the obstacles to skill building are a significant barrier to entry and require designers to reframe how they think about work (and their own learning). Livia Labate offers guidance on how to navigate these challenges.
Ame Elliott (Simply Secure)
Slides:   1-PDF 
User experience designers have an extraordinary opportunity to empower people to take control of their privacy. Ame Elliott shares examples of design for secure experiences and illustrates how UX can make systems more secure by addressing human behavior. Examples are applicable to a range of areas, including personal communication, business transactions, and government and nonprofit projects.
Mike Gadow (Fjord), Russell Wilkins (Uber)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Everyone is talking about transitions and motion in interfaces these days. But how does motion benefit UI? As designers, we face the challenge of communicating how motion should work (and its value) to other stakeholders. Mike Gadow and Russell Wilkins, motion designers turned UI designers, show how they use motion graphics and advocate for motion in user interfaces.

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