Design the Future
January 19–20, 2016: Training
January 20–22, 2016: Conference
San Francisco, CA

design thinking conference sessions

9:00am–12:30pm Wednesday, 01/20/2016
Dan Brown (EightShapes)
Great design projects start with discovery. More than just research and analysis, the discovery phase sets the tone for the project: you ensure you're solving the right problem, explore different approaches, and establish a plan. Dan Brown guides participants through the essential ingredients of discovery and demonstrates how to structure the discovery phase.
1:45pm–5:15pm Wednesday, 01/20/2016
C Todd Lombardo (Fresh Tilled Soil)
Slides:   external link
A design sprint is a time-boxed, disciplined way to get validation on an idea to ensure you design something people need and/or want. C Todd Lombardo guides you through a mini-design sprint so you can get firsthand experience of what it's like to participate in one. You’ll walk away knowing how to implement them in your organization.
4:35pm–5:15pm Friday, 01/22/2016
Brandon Harris (Gaijin.com)
Slides:   1-PDF 
As more people find community on the Web, designers need to use patterns and principles that protect our users from harassment—or worse. Brandon Harris discusses how our design decisions can make life unpleasant—or even dangerous—for users of community tools. Brandon offers best practices for user safety and describes ways we can provide protection for our users.
3:45pm–4:25pm Thursday, 01/21/2016
Tristan Harris (Google)
The attention economy reduces design to a race to the bottom of the brain stem to seduce our psychological instincts. What if we created an "organic movement" for design whose goal was to support humanity? Tristan Harris explores how this movement is possible by emphasizing "time well spent" instead of "time spent," in turn maximizing design's net positive contributions to people's lives.
1:15pm–1:55pm Thursday, 01/21/2016
Alexis Lloyd (The New York Times R&D Lab)
As computational systems play an ever more pervasive role in our lives, the design of those systems becomes increasingly important in terms of our ability to have satisfying and expressive experiences. Alexis Lloyd explores some new paradigms for designing systems that can collaborate better with people, becoming conversational and leaving room for human interpretation.
4:35pm–5:15pm Thursday, 01/21/2016
Suzanne Pellican (Intuit QuickBooks)
Slides:   external link
Suzanne Pellican explains how Intuit went from the "Best Run, No Growth Company in the Valley" to a "30-Year-Old Startup" by becoming design driven.
4:35pm–5:15pm Friday, 01/22/2016
Braden Kowitz (Google Ventures )
Braden Kowitz discusses the Google Ventures design sprint process.
4:35pm–5:15pm Friday, 01/22/2016
Eli Schiff (Consultant)
The design community has converged on a principle of austerity in the visual design of graphical user interfaces. Leaving behind the textured, dimensional aesthetic, designs today are superficially simple but ambiguous in use. As designers have reached effective consensus in embracing modern minimalism, it warrants questioning: have we lost something essential by rejecting representational UIs?
3:45pm–4:25pm Friday, 01/22/2016
Slides:   external link
Multiscreen experiences are powerful; we now divide our time between different devices based on context. At the same time, conversational assistants have evolved to be quite usable. But we’re just beginning to see how one assistant might work across an ecosystem of devices. Karen Kaushansky explores the future of designing with voice across multiple devices.
1:15pm–1:55pm Thursday, 01/21/2016
Slides:   external link
GitHub has an abundance of quantitative data about what people are doing. Over the past two years, it has built a practice of qualitative research dedicated to uncovering the why. Qualitative research surfaces blind spots with product and customers and has changed the way GitHub ships features. Using three examples, Chrissie Brodigan shares how GitHub rolls features out as controlled experiments.
2:05pm–2:45pm Thursday, 01/21/2016
Joe Robinson (Circle)
Thoughtful design and emerging technologies are changing the ways we interact with our money. With the advent of automated savings, hidden payments, robo-advisors, and blockchains, personal finance is changing more rapidly than ever before. Joe Robinson explores new trends in the design of personal financial services, how interactions with money are changing, and what to expect in the future.
4:35pm–5:15pm Thursday, 01/21/2016
Darren David (Stimulant), Jennifer Kolstad (HKS)
The intersection of physical and virtual space creates some of the most profound design challenges of our time but also creates tremendous opportunities. Darren David and Jen Kolstad discuss how merging the physical and digital in architecture can heighten people’s engagement with social space, energize relationships with each other, and add tangible value to projects.
9:00am–12:30pm Wednesday, 01/20/2016
Greg Nudelman (DesignCaffeine)
Greg Nudelman guides small groups through using low-fidelity paper prototyping techniques to envision, design, and test an Apple or Android wearable app coupled with a corresponding mobile app. Bring your ideas, and walk away with wireframes.
1:45pm–5:15pm Wednesday, 01/20/2016
Alastair Somerville (Acuity Design)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Understanding our own senses and how we create meaning is essential when designing for a world of hyper-user-centered devices that sense and talk to us, like wearables and the IoT. Alastair Somerville draws on his project knowledge and cognitive research to explore how we can rediscover our own senses and emotions to create frameworks for successful future product design.
1:15pm–1:55pm Friday, 01/22/2016
Julia Zorzanello Byron (IBM Corporation), Omkar Chandgadkar (IBM Corporation)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Personas created for individual users fail to capture complex interactions between users of enterprise systems. Julia Zorzanello Byron and Omkar Chandgadkar show how they created team-based personas and aligned various silos of their product team by involving team members during synthesis. Attendees will learn how they can adopt this model to make better decisions with their product teams.
4:35pm–5:15pm Friday, 01/22/2016
Ben Terrett (Co-operative Group)
Ben Terrett tells the design story of the UK Government Digital Service (GDS), an organization that has been copied around the world, including in the US and Australia, and explains how user-centered design focused on user needs and delivery can bring about real change and still be respected in the boardroom.
1:15pm–1:55pm Thursday, 01/21/2016
Dan Hon (Code for America)
Empathy is a real business value, and companies ignore it at their peril. Today, we aim to design products and services that genuinely meet real user needs, a new emphasis that relies on understanding and empathizing with users. In this new world, the companies that don't do so stick out like a sore thumb. Dan Hon explains how you can start building a culture of empathy in your organization today.
1:15pm–1:55pm Friday, 01/22/2016
Paul McConnell (Intersection), Mike Clare (Intersection)
In order to design for our cities, we have to evaluate and cater to the needs of many. Catering to a wider audience means adapting to several demographics while maintaining a cohesive vision. Paul McConnell and Mike Clare explore how designers can develop concepts and research strategies to create for a city-scale audience.
2:05pm–2:45pm Friday, 01/22/2016
Ame Elliott (Simply Secure)
Slides:   1-PDF 
User experience designers have an extraordinary opportunity to empower people to take control of their privacy. Ame Elliott shares examples of design for secure experiences and illustrates how UX can make systems more secure by addressing human behavior. Examples are applicable to a range of areas, including personal communication, business transactions, and government and nonprofit projects.
3:45pm–4:25pm Friday, 01/22/2016
Ben Brown (Howdy)
Messaging apps and chatrooms are platforms for a new type of application: one that is purely text based. This new type of app requires new processes and techniques and a different set of disciplines than previous apps or websites. Ben Brown delves into how designers are beginning to create these apps and discusses what it will mean for your app, brand, or publication to be all text.

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